Friday, August 13, 2010

selected work


"earth" vase
thrown and altered terra cotta
fired to cone 08 with lichen glazes



sculptural vase
thrown, assembled, and altered raku
fired to cone 08 in a tin foil saggar with slips, oxides and salt


sculptural vase
thrown, assembled, and altered raku
fired to cone 08 in a tin foil saggar with slips, oxides and salt



sculptural bowl
thrown raku
fired to cone 08 with salt fuming


tea bowl
thrown and altered raku


tea bowl
thrown and altered raku


tea bowl
thrown and altered raku


tea bowl
thrown and altered raku


side fired vase
thrown and altered porcelain
side fired to cone 7 with wood ash and oxides


raku sphere
thrown raku
fired to cone 08 with manganese glaze,
post-fire red. with copper


lichen bulb vase
thrown raku
residual salt fire to cone 1


Gestural Vase
thrown porcelain
residual salt fired to cone 1 with wood ash


side fired bulb vase
thrown and carved porcelain
side fired in a residual salt kiln to cone 1 with wood ash

tea bowl
wheel thrown porcelain
residual salt fired to cone 1 with wood ash



side fired vase
thrown and altered porcelain
side fired in a residual salt kiln to cone 1 with wood ash


"kiln gem" vase
thrown porcelain
side fired in a residual salt kiln to cone 1 with wood ash


side fired tea bowl *detail*
thrown porcelain
side fired in a residual salt kiln to cone 1 with wood ash


"Earth" vases
thrown, faceted, and altered raku clay
fired to cone 08 with lichen glaze


Thursday, March 11, 2010

glaze results









These cups and vases have been fired to cone 6 with a high copper glaze. To create drama and tension on the surfaces I sprinkled soda ash and fired them on their sides. These results completely defied my expectations, yet I can't stop thinking about them, their complexity, and their beauty.

Saturday, March 6, 2010

March Update

I will be putting up my first show at Mud Sweat and Tears Pottery in New York City on March 19th. Hard to believe, its only a few weeks away. The show will consist of work created at the studio, most of which will be of various traditional styles with a few new glaze types. I've been busy with kiln firing and clay maintenance at the studio, but have had ample time to reach into new realms on the wheel.


New hand carved feet on tea bowls

broken drum style vase


hand carved feet on gestural cups

gestural cups


hand carved foot on a tea bowl

tea bowl



drum style vase with handle




drum style vase

Thursday, February 11, 2010

gallery exploring

I came to NY with the assumption that there would be very little ceramics to view. At this point I think it's fair to say that this was a (mainly) true guess. However, I have not seen a single piece of ceramic art that I haven't fallen in love with. It's definitely quality over quantity here in the city.
The works by American masters such as Rowan, Troy, Wright, and Shapiro as well as the contemporary Japanese masters are well represented throughout the city, making a trip to a gallery for only two or three pieces of clay well worth the journey.

Having some time off, I ventured to the east side to visit a few galleries. The Joan B. Mirviss gallery was holding a show on the Japanese porcelain artist, Yoshikawa Masamichi, whose seihakuji glazes represent some of the most interesting achievements in contemporary pale blue celadon glazing. I'm beginning to find this style very fascinating. While it contains the tactile and elusive quality of raw clay, it bridges the gap between the archaic rustic wares (for which most wood fired ceramics is well known) and the sleek minimalism of most contemporary art. this is especially the case for the artist Kato Tsubusa, who works in the similar medium. Truly Beautiful.

Feeling quite inspired by the sleekness of the contemporary porcelain work I've seen as well as the natural ash glazed wares by many American potters of the northeast. While my interest in wood firing is growing from all this inspirational work, my fascination with the relationship between clay and tradition is growing at an even larger rate.

I will be unloading some new glaze results from the kiln tomorrow. Photo's to come.

The Pine Tree

The pine branches
once having stretched
their brittle fingers
like the empty hand
of a hungry child
now withdraw
and slump
with hands full of snow.
In the silence of the park
they rest.

Sunday, January 24, 2010

New York - New Work



















The past few weeks in New York have been such an informative experience. The act of trying to gather my thoughts about what I've seen so far is constantly interrupted by the sight of something new. Obviously not a very thriving ceramic art scene, but took the time to visit Dai Ichi Arts on the upper east side to see some pieces by a few current "heros" of japanese clay (Higashida Shigemasa, Kato Tsubusa, Kohara Yasuhiro, etc.) Very small, but intimate gallery space.



Holding a fly ash glazed Shigaraki tokkuri by Yasuhiro made me feel in a completely different place. No longer surrounded by the metal and concrete of NY, but rather feeling the transformed earth of Japan which has intrigued me for so long. Its the closest I'll get, for now.



Felt very inspired by these beautiful oribe and shino boxes of Shigemasa Higashida. I think I might start formulating some oribe works at Mud Sweat and Tears in my free time. Perhaps only having electric kilns in NY isn't the worst thing ever....






Anyway. Trying to get some work made in response to the little (but thought provoking) ceramics in the city. It's good to be around potters on a daily basis.
Progress, so far..



















Thrown forms, waiting to be altered - White stoneware




finished flower vase. White stoneware. ready to be glazed with a cone 6 oribe





Finished tokkuri waiting for glazing.




carved vase drying in the basement.



sake set drying in the basement.